BETWEEN CRIMINALIZATION AND CARE: Policing and Social Service Outreach in San Francisco’s Homeless Encampments

Dr. Brown and Dr. Yarbrough of SF State’s School of Public Affairs and Civic Engagement were panelist on a Storefront Lab discussion on October 11, 2016 titled “Towards a Compassionate City: A Conversation About Homeless Encampments”.  This panel examined how policing and social service outreach plays out on the streets of San Francisco on a day-to-day basis and what impact this has both on those experiencing homelessness and on the rest of the city. It provided a historical and national context for the roles and impacts of “quality of life” laws aimed at homelessness, similar to those initiatives on the November ballot and currently operating in San Francisco.  The panelists also discuss local propositions Prop Q – Prohibiting Tents on Public Sidewalks and Prop R Neighborhood Crime Unit. The panel is available to stream at https://soundcloud.com/storefrontlab/towards-a-compassionate-city-part-2-between-criminalization-and-care

 

 

Dr. Gen Co-Authors Article

Associate Professor Sheldon Gen (Public Administration, PACE) published an article titled “Strategies of Policy Advocacy Organizations and Their Theoretical Affinities: Evidence from Q-Methodology” (with Amy Conley Wright) in Policy Studies Journal. The article connects literature on nonprofits and policy change with policy studies literature on influence in the policy process to examine policy advocacy strategies of nonprofit organizations.

Dr. Stowers Authors Article with MPA Students

Professor Genie Stowers (Public Administration, PACE), with three MPA students, published “Understanding the content and features of open data portals in American cities” in Government Information Quarterly. This paper presents the result of research on features and content of open data portals in American cities. The authors developed five scales to categorize and describe these portals. Regression models explaining variation between cities on these scales indicate city population as an important influence, along with participation in a regional consortium. Overall, results indicate portals are in a very early stage of development and need a great deal of work to improve user help and analysis features as well as inclusion of features to help citizens understand the data.

PACE Practitioner-in-Residence awarded Juvenile Advocate of the Year

On Smacallaireptember 17th, CJCJ’s Executive Director and PACE Practitioner-in-Residence,  Daniel Macallair, was recognized by the Pacific Juvenile Defender Center (PJDC) for his decades of work in the field of juvenile justice. At PJDC’s 13th Annual Roundtable Conference, Macallair was honored with the Juvenile Advocate of the Year Award for 2016, and also provided the keynote address on the “History of the California Youth Authority and Lessons Not Learned.”

In his speech, Macallair detailed some of the findings of his new book After the Doors Were Locked: A History of Youth Corrections in California and the Origins of 21st Century Reform. He gave a brief history of California’s state youth corrections system, now the Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ), and the abuses and violence that have characterized these facilities from 1890 to present day. He also provided context for the cycles of reform that have taken place over the past century, but which subsequently failed to create safe institutions for California’s youth.

Daniel Macallair and CJCJ have focused on California’s youth corrections institutions since our organization’s inception. Recently, CJCJ released a report providing updated information on the state of DJJ titled Failure After Farrell: Violence and Inadequate Mental Health Care in California’s Division of Juvenile Justice (DJJ). The report finds that, despite the numerous reforms detailed in After the Doors Were Locked, California’s state youth corrections system remains plagued by increasing violence, pervasive gang culture, and deficient mental health treatment.